Virtual interactive dating game office

He usually replies with: “Next time, try the nice guy or geek personality, if you want someone to love you for who you are.”Even in the world of virtual romance, love takes practice.It requires us to take risks, face rejection, and revise our priorities.He comes courtesy of Voltage, a Japanese gaming company that specializes in romance games for women and that generated roughly million in revenue in 2015.In order for their relationship to progress, Mook must continually download Star-Crossed Myth and its sequels.“When I read their stories, I feel like they are real,” Mook says of her digital suitors.“It’s like I understand them.” last year found that nearly 40 percent of single Japanese millennials were not interested in romantic relationships, describing them as “bothersome.” And in the United States, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported in 2014 that there were now more single people in the country than married ones.

“They usually pick the alpha malefirst, which is more of a bad-boytype,” Amerson says.

Which begs the question: Can virtual relationships prepare gamers for real ones? They view their gaming habits as a positive form of escapism that also happens to teach virtues like empathy and tolerance.

“These games might help solve issues in your love life, as they make you see and understand new perspectives about love,” says Mook.

The first wildly popular virtual romance game created specifically with women in mind, called Angelique, was released in 1994 by a team of female developers at the Japanese gaming company Koei. Voltage, the leading company in the Japanese market, currently offers 84 different romance apps.

The virtual romance gamer is attracted to drama-driven story lines, says Kentaro Kitajima, vice president of Voltage.

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