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Letter, 11 July 1861, from James [-----] of Fairfax County, Virginia, to his sister "Puss" announcing the arrival of a new son; help of a physician from the 6th Alabama Regiment; preparation of Confederate troops at Manassas, Virginia; military movements in Fairfax County; sharpshooters; and news of their father from Alexandria, Virginia. The writer notes that there is Unionist sentiment in Richmond and many would welcome the Union army.

] in Richmond, Virginia, concerning the probable fall of Petersburg, Virginia, and the probable evacuation of Richmond to the Union army.

He also discusses harvesting of local fruits and berries and fishing.

Letters, 8-, from James [-----], a Union sharpshooter in Suffolk, Virginia, to Emeline, commenting on his broken rifle and the need to get it repaired, orders to destroy railroad tracks from Carrsville to Suffolk before Confederate forces can do the same, and the help that Chaplin Hyde has been to the morale of his camp.

[-----], hospital, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, in Louisa County, Virginia, to his wife, possibly in North Carolina, regarding his work in the 2nd Corps hospital in Louisa County, noting one patient with smallpox, and commenting that the overall number of sick in the hospital is down. Billie also comments on his duties and other military matters.

Letter, 23 July 1893, discusses the unveiling of the Confederate soldiers monument in Nottoway County, at which General Fitzhugh Lee (1835-1905) spoke.

Robert comments that he is suffering from jaundice, but is getting better; notes that the guard arrested some cavalrymen for a disturbance in a barber shop; states that citizens seeking passes must take the oath of allegiance; and asks for a pair of boots.

] from Robert [-----] to his brother John about serving as a member of the provost guard for Winchester, Virginia. He also laments the destruction at Fredericksburg, Virginia, but expresses his belief that General Burnside's campaign will ultimately capture Richmond.

Letter, 6 November 1864, from Richard [-----], in the Officers' General Hospital Ward 2, near Fort Monroe, Virginia, to his wife Libby in Lynn, Massachusetts, discussing his stay in the hospital, other patients, his hope of receiving a leave of absence or of being transferred to a Massachusetts hospital, and his family.

Mc Clellans (1826-1885) reluctance or fear to move the Union army and fight, reporting a rumor about Englands outrage over the removal of the Confederate emissaries Mason and Slidell in the Trent Affair, and commenting on camp life including the types of tents and building, the camp food, and personal gossip about people he and his sister know.

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